Baylor College of Medicine
Houston, Texas
Recent Online CME Additions
Note: All online CME activities are offered free of charge. Participants can only receive CME credit once for any activity in which they participate.
Prevent Hepatocellular Carcinoma through Screening, Vaccination, and Treatment of Viral Hepatitis
This activity is designed to make providers aware of the current guidelines for screening, vaccination, and treatment of hepatitis B and C, thereby increasing the proportion of patients being treated and preventing progression to hepatocellular carcinoma. The estimated time to complete this activity, including review of the materials is 0.25 hour(s). Released February 2018.
Contemporary Treatment Options for Prostate Cancer
In back-to-back publications in JAMA, two research teams reported patient-reported outcomes and quality of life in two separate populations of men with localized prostate cancer managed with contemporary treatment options - prostatectomy, external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), brachytherapy, and active surveillance. Across the two studies, each treatment strategy was associated with a distinct pattern of adverse effects in the 2 to 3 years after treatment. The findings of these studies are particularly important because they examine effects on patient functional outcomes and quality of life in large populations outside of clinical trials and focus on contemporary treatment options. The estimated time to complete this activity, including review of the materials is 1.25 hour(s). Released October 2017.
Noninvasive Treatments for Low Back Pain: Current State of the Evidence
Low back pain is one of the most frequently encountered conditions in clinical practice. Up to 84 percent of adults have low back pain at some time in their lives, and over one quarter of U.S. adults report recent (in the last 3 months) low back pain. Low back pain has high direct and indirect costs and is a common reason for missed work.Multiple treatment options for acute and chronic low back pain are available. This systematic review aimed to assess the benefits and harms of different pharmacological and noninvasive nonpharmacological therapies for adults with acute, subacute, or chronic nonradicular or radicular low back pain. The estimated time to complete this activity, including review of the materials is 0.50 hour(s).
Lung Cancer Screening With Low-Dose Computed Tomography (LDCT)
In 2012, lung cancer deaths accounted for about 27 percent of all cancer-related deaths in the United States. Although early detection and treatment is ideal, only 15 percent of lung cancer cases are diagnosed at an early stage. Primary care clinicians play a key role in determining the eligibility of patients for lung cancer screening, ensuring patients understand the benefits and harms of lung cancer screening, and working with patients to make decisions about screening that are consistent with the patients' values. This clinician summary provides an overview of the evidence from the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) which was the first trial to provide evidence to support screening for lung cancer with LDCT in reducing lung cancer deaths. The estimated time to complete this activity, including review of the materials is 0.50 hour(s). Released August 2016.
Update on the Zika Virus
The rapid spread of the Zika virus in the Americas and the rise in birth defects strongly associated with though not proven have led the World Health Organization to declare an international public health emergency. In this updated presentation Dr. Peter Hotez, Dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine reviews the virology, transmission, and factors associated with spread of the Zika virus. He also describes the current evidence for what is known about the virus, its symptoms, and the possible associations with microcephaly and other complications including Guillain-Barré Syndrome. The status of diagnostic testing and vaccine development are reviewed as are the CDC Pregnancy Guidelines. In the absence of a vaccine, Dr. Hotez also describes the essential steps to take in prevention. The estimated time to complete this activity, including review of the materials is 1.0 hour(s). Released July 2016.
Management of Infantile Hemangioma
Infantile hemangioma (IH) is the most common tumor of childhood and is estimated to affect about 4 to 5 percent of children. With a course of expectant observation, many patients experience a complete involution without significant sequelae. However, in a fraction of patients, early referral for treatment is important. Uncertainty remains around which interventions might be most beneficial as first-line therapies, when alternative or adjunctive therapies are appropriate after first-line treatment is unsuccessful, and how the disease site informs treatment decisions. This review aims to address some of these issues. The estimated time to complete this activity, including review of the materials is 0.50 hour(s).
Upcoming Changes to the Methodology Standards and Specific Questions to the Data Standards
In this module we will speak with experts on the Methodology Committee to obtain clarification regarding the role(s) researchers might undertake in dissemination and implementation after they have completed their PCORI funded investigations, and the practical and operational differences between registries and data networks and when they might be best used. Also, this module highlights changes coming in the standards this year. The estimated time to complete this activity, including review of the materials is 1.0 hour(s).
Interventions To Improve Appropriate Antibiotic Prescribing for Uncomplicated Acute Respiratory Tract Infections
In the United States, at least 2 million people are infected with antibiotic-resistant bacteria each year, causing approximately 23,000 deaths. A key factor for the increased rate of antibiotic resistance is high outpatient consumption of antibiotics. Antibiotics are frequently inappropriately used for uncomplicated acute RTIs.The factors associated with overuse of antibiotics for uncomplicated acute RTIs are numerous and diverse. Consequently, strategies to reduce antibiotic use vary in targets and designs. Interventions include clinical strategies (e.g., use of point-of-care diagnostic tests, delayed antibiotic prescribing), system-level strategies (e.g., electronic decision support), education (e.g., strategies to improve communication between clinicians and patients, public education campaigns), and multifaceted approaches that incorporate various elements. The systematic review summarized herein assesses the effectiveness and adverse consequences of possible strategies for reducing antibiotic use in adults and children with acute RTIs. The estimated time to complete this activity, including review of the materials is 0.50 hour(s).
Transitional Care Interventions To Prevent Readmissions for People With Heart Failure
Despite an almost 30 percent decline in heart failure (HF) hospitalizations in the United States during the past decade, readmission rates for HF patients have not decreased during the past 2 decades and readmissions account for an estimated $15 billion in annual Medicare spending. Studies have suggested that the use of transitional care interventions, such as home visiting, telephone support, telemonitoring, and patient education, might reduce the rate of preventable readmissions. In 2013, the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association developed a guideline to address disease management immediately after discharge for HF. However, current clinical practice in the care of adults with HF after hospitalization varies greatly. In addition, uncertainty remains about effective strategies to reduce early readmission rates for these patients. The systematic review summarized in this activity aimed to assess the efficacy, comparative effectiveness, and harms of transitional care interventions for adults with HF. The estimated time to complete this activity, including review of the materials is 0.5 hour(s).
Standards for Specific Study Designs - Standard Groups 9 and 10 - Adaptive and Bayesian Trials Designs and Studies of Diagnostic Tests
This module is designed to provide investigators, clinicians interested in CER investigation, and other learners with an understanding of the PCORI Methodology Standards for Specific Study Designs and Methods for Standard Groups 9 (Adaptive and Bayesian Trial Designs) and 10 (Diagnostic Tests). With respect to Adaptive and Bayesian Trial Designs, the module will cover the purpose or goals of employing such designs, the types of adaptations that a trial can undergo, and the differences and similarities between adaptive trials and other randomized trials. Regarding Standards for Diagnostic Tests, the module will summarize the standards and introduce the learner to the major methodological issues faced in designing studies of diagnostic tests. The estimated time to complete this activity, including review of the materials is 0.50 hour(s).
PCORI Methodology Standards: Standards Categories 1 & 2 – Formulating Research Questions and Patient Centeredness
This module is designed in two parts to provide investigators, clinicians interested in CER investigation, and other learners with an overview of the Standards for Formulating Research Questions and the Standards for Patient Centeredness. In Part 1 both sets of standards are reviewed. Specifically in the Standards for Formulating Research Questions the elements relevant to study design are covered and include identifying gaps in evidence; developing a formal protocol; identifying specific populations and subgroups and the relevant health decisions, inventions, comparators, and outcomes for investigation. The Standards for Patient-Centeredness provide guidance on engaging patients throughout the study process including in the subsequent dissemination and implementation of the results. A framework for continuous patient engagement is presented.1 In Part 2 approaches to adherence to the standards are discussed with a focus on the Standards for Patient Centeredness. The estimated time to complete this activity, including review of the materials is 1.00 hour(s).
PCORI Methodology Standards: Role of Standards in PCORI Funding Announcements and the Application Process
This module is designed to provide investigator clinicians interested in CER investigation, and other learners with an overview of the role PCORI’s Methodology Standards in PCORI’s funding announcements as part of the Institute’s commitment to improving the quality of research methodologies. The faculty describe how the standards are applied in developing a research proposal for submission. This process is illustrated in an interview with a recently funded PCORI investigator who describes incorporating the Methodology Standards into his proposal and his experience in using the standards once the project was underway. The estimated time to complete this activity, including review of the materials is 0.50 hour(s).
PCORI Methodology Standards: Categories 3, 4, & 5—Data Integrity, Preventing and Handling Missing Data, and Heterogeneity of Treatment Effects
This module is designed to provide investigators, clinicians interested in CER investigation, and other learners with an understanding of three important cross-cutting standards for CER. The Standards for Data Integrity & Rigorous Analyses address the need for investigators (once they have selected their study design and analytical approach) to report on the data accuracy, availability, validity, and study decision. The Standards for Preventing and Handling Missing Data address the fact that virtually every study will have some missing data and investigators need to have plans to minimize the missing data, how to handle missing data in the subsequent analyses, and how to report those findings in the interpretation of the study results. And finally, the rationale for the Standards for Heterogeneity of Treatment Effects relate to the fact that the effectiveness of the treatment may actually vary depending on patient characteristics, and thus by definition each heterogeneity of treatment effect implies that different people do not respond the same way to the same treatment or exposure. These standards are important in helping to answer the patient-centered question, “What is likely to happen to patients like me?” The estimated time to complete this activity, including review of the materials is 0.50 hour(s).
PCORI Methodology Standards: Basic Context, Role and Development of Standards in Comparative Effectiveness Research
This educational activity is one of a series of CME/CE activities designed to introduce PCORI's Methodology Standards, review the development and types of standards, and provide context and guidance for adherence relevant to the use and application of these standards in research and in responding to PCORI funding announcements. This module is designed to provide investigators, clinicians interested in comparative effectiveness research (CER), and other learners with the rationale for CER, the rationale and role for standards in CER or patient-centered outcomes research, and an overview of the development of the standards. The estimated time to complete this activity, including review of the materials is 0.50 hour(s).
PCORI Methodology Standards: Categories 6, 7, and 8—Data Registries, Data Networks, and Casual Inference
This module is designed to provide investigators/clinicians interested in comparative effectiveness research investigation, and other learners with an understanding of the standards for specific study designs and methods—all primarily relevant to observational studies. This module, divided into two parts, addresses the common flaws in observational studies including weaknesses in data sources and in study design and analysis. The first presentation covers the categories of standards for registries and for data networks designed to improve data sources in observational studies; and the second presentation reviews the standards for causal inference (i.e., a set of conceptual and statistical approaches) to strengthen observational study design and analysis. The estimated time to complete this activity, including review of the materials is 1.00 hour(s).
Childhood Cancer: Potential Late Effects
This online CME activity is designed to offer broad training for physicians who might not feel comfortable caring for survivors of childhood cancer. It will provide learners with an overview of potential late effects of treatment and enable learners to identify guideline recommended surveillance for childhood cancer patients.The estimated time to complete this activity, including review of the materials is 0.50 hour(s).
Passport for Care: A Clinical Decision Support Tool for Care Providers and a Resource Site for Survivors of Childhood Cancer
This online CME activity is designed to offer broad training for physicians who might not feel comfortable caring for survivors of childhood cancer. The training is designed to provide learners with resources and guidelines for clinical decision support and for the proper care of survivors. The estimated time to complete this activity, including review of the materials is 0.25 hour(s).
Childhood Cancer: Epidemiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment
This online CME activity is designed for physicians who might not feel comfortable caring for survivors of childhood cancer by offering broad training on the epidemiology of common pediatric cancers and on the prognosis for those cancers. The estimated time to complete this activity, including review of the materials is 0.25 hour(s).
Medication Nonadherence Is Associated with Increased Healthcare Utilization in Pediatric Patients with Chronic Diseases
This online CME activity reviews the relationship between medication nonadherence and health care use (i.e., hospitalizations, emergency department visits, outpatient visits) and costs in children and adolescents who have a chronic medical condition. The activity also reviews interventions and tools to support a combined educational and behavioral approach to enhancing compliance in children and adolescents whose treatment histories suggest less-than-ideal medication adherence. The estimated time to complete this activity, including review of the materials is .75 hour(s). Released: May 2014.
Bone Health, Race/Ethnicity, and Emerging Technologies for Predicting Risk of Fracture and Limitations in Use With Specified Subpopulations
This online activity is designed to familiarize clinicians with current issues around osteoporosis and osteoporosis-related fracture risk in different subpopulations and to promote awareness of the Fracture Risk Assessment (FRAX®) tool for assessing osteoporosis-related fracture risk and the implications for clinical practice associated with known limitations of the FRAX tool. The estimated time to complete this activity, including review of the materials is .75 hour(s). Released: February 2014.

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Last Modified: January 31, 2012